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Binge drinking BEFORE you get pregnant ‘can have life-long effects on future children’

Apr 3, 2017  by 21bethere

An American study suggests it raises the risk of having children born with high blood sugar
WOMEN who binge drink before they become pregnant risk harming their babies, a study suggests. They are more likely to have children with high blood sugar, increasing their chances of developing diabetes as adults…  "These findings suggest that the effects of a mother's alcohol misuse before conception may be passed on to her offspring. "These changes could have lifelong effects on the offspring's glucose function and possibly increase their susceptibility to diabetes." For more https://www.thesun.co.uk/living/3239735/binge-drinking-before-you-get-pregnant-can-have-life-long-effects-on-future-children/  

 


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Our teens are out of control. Why? Because parents are too weak

Mar 27, 2017  by 21bethere

The response has been predictable: shock, horror, revulsion, fear, incredulity and blame.
The fact is teenage girls are being sexually assaulted every weekend at parties, according to drug and alcohol campaigner Paul Dillon.
“It literally happens every single weekend and the saddest part is that girls very rarely report it because they think it’s part of the alcohol experience,” he told me this week.
“I can’t tell you the number of girls who’ve told me they’ve blacked out and only found out there’s been a guy on top of them or having sex with them when they’ve been shown a photograph.”
Dillon advises making it as “bloody difficult as humanly possible” for teens to drink. If you won’t supply alcohol or let them drink at home and they threaten to go and drink in the park, don’t cave. As he says, most won’t.
 
Increasing the Minimum Drinking Age MLDA to 21 and better enforcement of secondary supply laws  will help reduce these appalling incidences!
 
 
For more http://www.couriermail.com.au/rendezview/our-teens-are-out-of-control-why-because-parents-are-too-weak/news-story/16385caa0004cc3600e797d4f442c9a3?utm_source=The%20Courier%20Mail&utm_mediam=email&utm_campaign=editorial  

 


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IHHP - Normanton "Think Smart" – The Drink?

Mar 14, 2017  by 21bethere

  

 


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Knox welfare workers find up to a third of bottle shops selling alcohol to youngsters without asking for proof of age

Feb 16, 2017  by 21bethere


Kimberley Seedy, Knox Leader

·         Call to close underage drinking loophole
·         ALDI’s tough stance on alcohol
·         Parents key to stopping binge drinking in kids
·         Bottle shops’ shocking underage statistic

A COVERT operation by a Knox welfare group has found a third of bottle shops they investigated selling alcohol to young people without checking for identification.
Representatives from Communities That Care Knox — a partnership of 25 organisations, including Knox Council, Victoria Police and Eastern Access Community Health — went undercover at 27 bottle shops across Knox during a month last year to check if they were selling alcohol to underage customers.
The check involved a legal-aged person who looked underage trying to buy alcohol, with an independent monitor present.
The exercise found a third of bottle shops sold alcohol without checking ID cards.

For More http://www.heraldsun.com.au/leader/outer-east/knox-welfare-workers-find-up-to-a-third-of-bottle-shops-selling-alcohol-to-youngsters-without-asking-for-proof-of-age/news-story/c0fe85901d3455aef6fb538a6dac3a8f  

 


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Iceland knows how to stop teen substance abuse but the rest of the world isnt listening

Jan 30, 2017  by 21bethere

Iceland knows how to stop teen substance abuse but the rest of the world isn’t listening
In Iceland, teenage smoking, drinking and drug use have been radically cut in the past 20 years. Emma Young finds out how they did it, and why other countries won’t follow suit.
https://mosaicscience.com/story/iceland-prevent-teen-substance-abuse   ...Read More

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Results of student alcohol survey released

Jan 28, 2017  by 21bethere


Story: Prishita Eloise Maheshwari-Aplin   Twitter: TCSNewspaper   
JANUARY 28, 2017
http://www.tcs.cam.ac.uk/assets/news/thumbs/main/12429334035_91cb638105_z.jpgImage credit: Kimery Davis
A recent survey by the University of Cambridge, involving more than 6,000 undergraduate and graduate students, has presented a number of alcohol-related statistics, such as the fact that while almost 30% of students do not drink, a similar percentage drink more than the recommended weekly limit.
The mix of gender (52% female, 48% male) and level of study (67% undergraduate and 33% postgraduate) of survey respondents reflects the makeup of the Cambridge student body and has allowed the university to compare results with those obtained by the National Union of Students (NUS) in 2016 from students at 21 higher education institutions in the UK.  
The Cambridge survey showed that 25% of Cambridge students drink to get drunk regularly, with students generally citing various reasons for drinking. This included having fun (73%), to relax after a hard day (42%), peer pressure (20%), social routine (36%), and to overcome anxiety (18%).
21% of students reported sexual harassment (drinkers and non-drinkers), with 74% of those believing that alcohol had, in some way, been a factor. A high proportion of students overall felt there was a need for more alcohol-free spaces (40%)
For more http://www.tcs.cam.ac.uk/news/0036599-results-of-student-alcohol-survey-released.html  

 


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Sign up for new campaign ‘One Year No Beer’ and get healthy

Jan 24, 2017  by 21bethere

Sign up for new campaign ‘One Year No Beer’ and get healthy
One Year No Beer, a new alcohol-free challenge launches today and aims to encourage more people to give up drinking. OYNB is a lifestyle initiative that focuses on changing people’s relationship with alcohol and in turn improving mind, body, life and relationships. The campaign mission is simple: change the attitudes around alcohol by providing the public with a resource to enable them to achieve clarity and confidence without booze for 30, 60, 90 or 365 days. Contrary to Dry January, often a lonely, laborious battle, OYNB already has 10,000 people signed up and adopts a distinctly positive approach to build confidence, motivation and create strategies for people to enjoy life alcohol-free.

Read more at: http://www.wigantoday.net/news/sign-up-for-new-campaign-one-year-no-beer-and-get-healthy-1-8336459
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Australian approach to alcohol “dismal”

Jan 23, 2017  by 21bethere

Authored by CHARLOTTE MITCHELL
Alcohol and tax — time for real reformMJA PERSPECTIVE

Perceptions of Australasian emergency department staff of the impact of alcohol-related presentationsMJA RESEARCH

Australia Day 2016: alcohol-related presentations to emergency departmentsMJA SHORT REPORT
 
Issue 1 / 16 January 2017
TACKLING alcohol advertising in sport is crucial to reducing excessive drinking, say experts, after new research reveals high rates of alcohol-related presentations to hospitals on Australia Day.
Ms Julia Stafford, executive officer at the McCusker Centre for Action on Alcohol and Youth told MJA InSight that “while alcohol companies promote and profit from the link between alcohol and our national day, emergency departments (EDs) are dealing with the ugly consequences”.
She said that Australia’s emergency services have “waited long enough for evidence-based alcohol policies that will reduce the burden”.
“We need a comprehensive approach that includes independent regulation of alcohol promotion, reform of the alcohol tax system and effective controls on when and where alcohol is available.”
For complete article go to http://www.doctorportal.com.au/mjainsight/2017/1/australian-approach-to-alcohol-dismal/?utm_source=MJA+InSight&utm_campaign=7a2169bd1a-EMAIL_CAMPAIGN_2017_01_13&utm_medium=email&utm_term=0_7346f35e23-7a2169bd1a-43048133
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Homicide and the night-time economy

Jan 4, 2017  by 21bethere

Trends & issues in crime and criminal justice no. 521
Stephen Tomsen, Jason Payne; 23 December 2016; Source: Australian Institute of Criminology
 
The relationship between the consumption of alcohol and a range of violent crimes, including homicide, is overwhelmingly acknowledged by criminologists. Less is known about the specifics of this relationship—in particular, whether the worst alcohol related violence occurs in private, or in public settings such as Australia’s expanding night-time leisure areas.
This study finds no evidence of a substantial concentration of homicides in specific night-time leisure areas. Homicides are, however, both directly and indirectly related to the night-time economy, with indirectly related incidents outweighing others. This finding affirms the need to persist with strategies to limit intoxication associated with night-time leisure, and further explore ways to control the sale of and access to alcohol in the general community.
For complete article http://www.aic.gov.au/publications/current%20series/tandi/521-540/tandi521.html   ...Read More

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Heavy alcohol use changes adolescents brains

Dec 12, 2016  by 21bethere

Date: December, 2016
Source: University of Eastern Finland
Summary: Heavy alcohol use during adolescence alters the development of brain, according to a recent study from the University of Eastern Finland and Kuopio University Hospital. Cortical thinning was observable in young people who had been heavy drinkers throughout their adolescence. The findings were published in Addiction.
Cingulate cortex has an important role in impulse control, and volumetric changes in this area may play an important role in the development of a substance use disorder later in life. Structural changes in the insula, on the other hand, may reflect a reduced sensitivity to alcohol's negative subjective effects, and in this way contribute to the development of a substance use disorder.
"The exact mechanism behind these structural changes is not known. However, it has been suggested that some of the volumetric changes may be reversible if alcohol consumption is reduced significantly. As risk limits of alcohol consumption have not been defined for adolescents, it would be important to screen and record adolescent substance use, and intervene if necessary." For more https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2016/12/161208085850.htm  

 


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Alcohol use and motivations for drinking among types of young adult illicit stimulant users

Dec 6, 2016  by 21bethere

Alcohol use and motivations for drinking among types of young adult illicit stimulant users - Trends & issues in crime and criminal justice ISSN 0817-8542: No 515, November 2016
Ellen Leslie, Andrew Smirnov, Jake M Najman & John Scott
Abstract: Drinking among young adult users of amphetamine-type stimulants (ATS) during episodes of ecstasy and
methamphetamine use is reported to have a number of possible functions, such as mitigating the unwanted effects
of the drugs, enhancing intoxication and pleasure, and increasing drinking capacity. While there is evidence to suggest a high prevalence of risky drinking among users of ATS in Australia, little is known about how they combine their use of ATS with the
consumption of alcohol or why they do so. This paper considers how ATS users consume alcohol during ecstasy and methamphetamine use, and also addresses alcohol abuse and dependence among low-risk and at-risk ATS users.
At-risk users are more likely to have experienced alcohol abuse and dependence during adolescence or early adulthood, suggesting that higher-risk use of ATS may be linked with problematic drinking patterns. The paper suggests that problematic
behaviour relating to alcohol and ATS use is interlinked, and may be important in developing appropriate policy responses.
 
Findings: The findings of this study also raise the question of whether the synergistic use of alcohol with illicit stimulants, particularly ecstasy, may lead to increased short- and long-term physical and social harms than the separate use of these substances. The combined use of alcohol and stimulants has been linked with risky behaviours including extremely risky levels of drinking (McKetin et al. 2014) and risky sexual behaviour (Breen et al. 2006). Further research is necessary to examine the potential adverse health and social outcomes of combined alcohol and stimulant use. For complete article go to http://aic.gov.au/publications/current%20series/tandi/501-520/tandi515.html   ...Read More

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Change

Dec 5, 2016  by 21bethere

  

 


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Drinking excessively while young can trigger serious and permanent health problems

Nov 4, 2016  by 21bethere

Krystal Johnson - Yahoo7 News on November 4, 2016
Young adults who drink too much alcohol may have "hidden health consequences" that are difficult to wipe away even decades after conquering their problem drinking, a study revealed.
Chronic drinkers suffered more medical conditions than non-drinkers and were twice as likely to get depression, according to a Journal of Studies on Alcohol and Drugs study published on Tuesday… The study revealed those who were chronic drinks at a young age had three medical conditions in later life whereas those who weren't alcohol dependent had two.
On a depression scale, people who drank at a young age were twice as likely to get depression and the effects were seen among those who had been free of dependence symptoms for several decades.
For complete story https://au.news.yahoo.com/a/33102669/drinking-excessively-while-young-can-trigger-serious-and-permanent-health-problems/?utm_source=ADF+Master+List&utm_campaign=3323f4c2ca-GrogWatch_October_08_11_2016&utm_medium=email&utm_term=0_fe135ee49e-3323f4c2ca-297991633#page1
   

 


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Teens binge on 17 drinks at a time study

Oct 24, 2016  by 21bethere

Sarah Wiedersehn - NZ Newswire on October 24, 2016, 10:31 am
Many Australian teens are consuming up to 17 alcoholic drinks at one time that often results in regrettable sexual encounters and loss of consciousness, new research has found.
A study of 16 to 19-year-olds representing the 25 per cent who drink the most among their peers has led to calls for greater action to help this vulnerable group of young Australians.
Conducted by researchers at Monash and Curtin Universities, the study found the heaviest-drinking teen boys, most of whom were either at university of still in school, consumed on average 17 standard drinks during their last big drinking session.
Teen girls drank around 14 standard alcoholic drinks.
Half of those surveyed for the study, published in the Australian and New Zealand Journal of Public Health journal, described this session as a 'normal get-together' 

For complete story go to https://au.news.yahoo.com/a/32985870/teens-binge-on-17-drinks-at-a-time-study/#page1   ...Read More

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Sobering findings in alcohol study

Oct 11, 2016  by 21bethere

A new report by the Australian Institute of Health and Welfare (AIHW) has found that while young adults are more likely than any other age group to drink at risky levels, they were the least likely to receive treatment for alcohol use.
It found instead that it was the older age groups who were more likely to receive treatment, with almost half (49 per cent) of clients receiving treatment for alcohol being aged in their forties.
Spokesperson for the AIHW, Tim Beard said the report, Trends in Alcohol Availability, Use and Treatment 2003-04 to 2014-15 revealed that overall, the use of alcohol treatment had increased to 30 treatment episodes per 10,000 people in 2013-14, up 20 per cent from a decade ago.
“While treatment for alcohol use had been consistently rising, alcohol consumption has fallen,” Mr Beard said.
“In 2013-14, consumption of alcohol was 9.7 litres per person, down from 10.8 litres in 2008-09.
“On the same note, the proportion of Australians who abstain from drinking alcohol has also risen in recent years, from 17 per cent in 2004 to 22 per cent in 2013.”

“Between 2004 and 2013 there was an 11 per cent fall in the rate of Australians drinking at risky levels on a single occasion (from 2,950 to 2,640 per 10,000 population), and a 13 per cent fall in those drinking at risky levels over their lifetime (from 2,080 to 1,820 per 10,000 population),” Mr Beard said. He said there had also been some positive trends in risky alcohol consumption.
“These results suggest strategies such as increasing the price of alcohol, restricting trading hours and reducing outlet density can have positive outcomes in reducing the overall consumption levels of alcohol.”
He said that while there were positive drinking patterns emerging overall, patterns of risky drinking and alcohol dependence continued to be significant issues in Australia, with less favourable patterns seen among some groups.
The 40-page report can be accessed from the AIHW website at http://www.aihw.gov.au/WorkArea/DownloadAsset.aspx?id=60129557169
  

 


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Why do poor people have more alcohol-related deaths than rich people?

Oct 2, 2016  by 21bethere

http://www3.imperial.ac.uk/newsandeventspggrp/imperialcollege/medicine/newssummary/news_21-9-2016-11-35-23
Walsh’s paper examines how drinking patterns, lifestyle factors, access to healthcare and social context play a role in why poorer people suffer greater harmful health effects of alcohol, even with lower average consumption.
 
“The disproportionate effect of alcohol consumption affecting populations of low socioeconomic status is unusual, given the normally positive relationship between exposure and consequence,” he explains.
 
“In lower socioeconomic groups, alcohol use is more polarised, with higher levels of both abstinence and binge drinking. Binge drinking has more destructive effects and negates the apparent cardio-protective benefits of moderate drinking.
 
“There is also a multiplicative effect between alcohol and cigarette smoking. With mouth and throat cancer, for example, it has been found that its prevalence is seven times greater with tobacco use and six times greater with alcohol use—but thirty-eight times greater for those using both tobacco and alcohol.”
For Copy of Essay go to! http://www.m-c-a.org.uk/documents/2016_essay_2  

 


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Strong alcohol policies can help prevent suicide

Sep 22, 2016  by 21bethere

2016 – Research Society on Alcoholism
Summary:
Suicide was the tenth leading cause of death in the United States in 2013. There is clear evidence that intoxication and chronic, heavy drinking are often associated with suicide. While alcohol policies are known to be effective in reducing excessive drinking, this review undertakes a critical look at the literature on the relationship between alcohol policies and suicide. For complete article https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2016/09/160912173955.htm  

 


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Drinking to belong: Students and low self-esteem

Sep 15, 2016  by 21bethere

September 2016
It's that time of year again, when students old and new are heading to university. Certain behaviors might be expected in the coming months, drinking in particular. Drinking is widespread among student populations, whether for social enrichment or the need to conform. However, many college students experience the darker side of binge drinking; violence, unsafe sex or poor academic performance. Hamilton & DeHart's new research in Self and Identity examines motivations for drinking in students with low self-esteem, finding that these individuals indulge far more than their more confident peers.
 
Hamilton & DeHart carried out a friendship threat manipulation on 195 students, all of whom had their levels of self-esteem, explicit and implicit, evaluated. They were asked to think about their best friend and what aspects of themselves they kept secret from said friend. Both groups were then shown bogus articles, the first on how secrets between friends cause conflict and a second control group on the secret aspects of selves which bear no relationship to friendships. All participants were questioned the following night on how many drinks they had consumed with other friends - not their best friend - after the test.
Read More http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/releases/312770.php
   

 


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The health impacts of alcohol

Sep 13, 2016  by 21bethere

According to the World Health Organisation (WHO), the harmful use of alcohol results in 3.3 million deaths every year, representing 5.9% of all deaths, and it is a causal factor in more than 200 disease and injury conditions. Overall 5.1% of the global burden of disease and injury is attributable to alcohol, as measured in disability-adjusted life years (DALYs). Alcohol consumption causes death and disability relatively early in life. In the age group 20 – 39 years approximately 25% of the total deaths are alcohol-attributable. There are gender differences in alcohol-related mortality, morbidity, as well as levels and patterns of alcohol consumption. The percentage of alcohol-attributable deaths among men amount to 7.6% of all global deaths compared to 4.0 % of all deaths among women.” For full report go to http://www.ias.org.uk/uploads/pdf/Factsheets/FS%20health%20impacts%20092016.pdf  

 


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A map of the world according to who binge drinks the most

Aug 30, 2016  by 21bethere

Posted a month ago by Louis Doré in news
Picture: Daniel Berehulak/Getty
It turns out the kids might not be partying like it's 1999 anymore.
Research by YouGov this week compared younger generations in the UK favourably with counterparts in Germany and the US for binge drinking.
1
In all of these countries, hard drinking is decreasing in young people.
In 2014, a report by the World Health Organisation found that the UK was the 13th highest country of 196 for heavy drinking as the below chart by Statista shows.
For rest of article go to.. http://indy100.independent.co.uk/article/a-map-of-the-world-according-to-who-binge-drinks-the-most--WyYR2knz8b  

 


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Differences between abstinent and non-abstinent individuals in recovery from alcohol use disorders.

Aug 25, 2016  by 21bethere

Abstract
OBJECTIVE:
Non-abstinent goals can improve quality of life (QOL) among individuals with alcohol use disorders (AUDs). However, prior studies have defined "recovery" based on DSM criteria, and thus may have excluded individuals using non-abstinent techniques that do not involve reduced drinking. Furthermore, no prior study has considered length of time in recovery when comparing QOL between abstinent and non-abstinent individuals. The current aims are to identify correlates of non-abstinent recovery and examine differences in QOL between abstainers and non-abstainers accounting for length of time in recovery.
CONCLUSIONS:
Non-abstainers are younger with less time in recovery and less problem severity but worse QOL than abstainers. Clinically, individuals considering non-abstinent goals should be aware that abstinence may be best for optimal QOL in the long run. Furthermore, time in recovery should be accounted for when examining correlates of recovery.
Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
For complete report briefing go to  http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25117850   ...Read More

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Implement strict controls… direct and indirect advertising of alcoholic beverages and ensure that no form of advertising is specifically addressed to young people, for instance, through the linking of alcohol to sports.

Jul 18, 2016  by 21bethere

(World Health Organisation European Charter on Alcohol strategies for alcohol action 1995)
 
When does alcohol sponsorship of sport become sports sponsorship of alcohol?
“Following Formula One’s sponsorship deal with Heineken, Eurocare vice-president Lauri Beekmann speculates over the real benefits to the funding of national and global sports for the major alcohol industry players
We expect anything from the drinks industry, what they do is in the interest of their business, that’s why the letter was sent to the F1 management. The ball is in the court of sports leaders and national and international policy makers. They have to understand that when it comes to alcohol, sponsorship money is not only about sports but about alcohol policy that has these same goals everywhere: to reduce alcohol related harm, overall consumption levels and youth exposure to alcohol. They may say and think that they can’t solve alcohol problems and deal with alcohol policy issues, that they are just there for their sports. But if they accept alcohol money, they are part of the problem. They must ask themselves, when does alcohol sponsorship of sport become sports sponsorship of alcohol?
A good example comes from Australia where 12 sporting organisations have agreed to end all existing and future alcohol sponsorship agreements. In exchange, the groups will share $25 million in replacement government funding taken from new alcopops tax revenues. As a sports fan I agree that other measures have to be found to replace the alcohol money. A simple ban could leave some sports without necessary support. But as the Australian case shows, it´s possible.
 
Heineken's generous F1 sponsorship attempts to present that they are irreplaceable. Big Tobacco tried this before, but lost the battle. Nick Fry, Former CEO of Mercedes AMG Petronas Formula One Team said about losing the tobacco sponsorship: “While tobacco companies were generous partners of Formula 1 for nearly four decades, the reality is that a large number of companies did not want to be associated with a team with tobacco logos on the car and indeed some didn't want to be associated with the sport, which was very tobacco oriented. This really has opened up a whole new door.”
For complete article go to… http://www.ias.org.uk/Blog/When-does-alcohol-sponsorship-of-sport-become-sports-sponsorship-of-alcohol.aspx   ...Read More

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New study shows a generational shift toward lighter drinking in Australia

Jul 6, 2016  by 21bethere

Alcohol consumption in Australia has declined steadily during the past decade, with per capita consumption in 2013-14 reaching its lowest level since the early 1960s. A new study published by the scientific journal Addiction shows that the overall decline in drinking is due mainly to less drinking among people in their teens and early twenties.
A study led by Dr Michael Livingston of Australia's Centre for Alcohol Policy Research at La Trobe University analysed the drinking habits of 124,440 Australians aged 14 to 79 years, surveyed over 18 years. The results show that recent declines in per-capita consumption appear to be driven by two major changes: (1) the ageing of heavier drinking cohorts into lighter drinking stages of the life-course and (2) sharp reductions in drinking among recently born cohorts.
For complete article go to… http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/releases/311338.php  

 


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Better parenting has led to decline in underage drinking, report finds

Jul 1, 2016  by 21bethere

Underage drinking has fallen substantially over the past 10 years. Photograph: Alamy
Sarah BoseleyHealth editor
Friday 1 July 2016 09.01 AESTLast modified on Friday 1 July 201609.46 AEST
Better parenting is one of the main reasons for a big drop in underage drinking, according to a leading alcohol charity.
The Institute of Alcohol Studies says today’s parents are less likely to drink in front of their children, more likely to disapprove of them drinking and more likely to know where they are and what they are doing. In recent years, parents have also had warmer relationships with their children, the charity claims. All of this tends to influence young people under the age of 16 not to try alcohol, it says.
Underage drinking has fallen substantially over the past 10 years. In 2003, 61% of 11- to 15-year-olds in England had tried alcohol. The most recent available data shows that by 2014 this had fallen to 38%.
 
In an attempt to understand why this might be and discourage more children from taking to drink, the institute investigated a number of theories – one of which is that young people are turning their backs on alcohol in a backlash against their parents, as Saffy in the comedy TV series and now film Absolutely Fabulous rejects the champagne-fuelled lifestyle of her mother.
 
Read more https://www.theguardian.com/society/2016/jul/01/better-parenting-has-led-to-decline-in-underage-drinking-report-finds     

 


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Alcohol was there, always: Elspeth Muir on her brothers death and Australias drinking culture

Jun 29, 2016  by 21bethere

After her 21-year-old brother jumped drunk into a river and drowned, the Brisbane writer reflects on a destructive force that Australia isn’t talking about…Elspeth Muir with her brother Alexander, who died at 21 after drinking too much and jumping into the Brisbane river. Muir’s memoir explores her own culpability in excusing the drinking culture that led to Alexander’s death.
 
Elspeth Muir’s brother Alexander jumped into Brisbane river weeks after turning 21. When they pulled his body out of the water three days later, his blood-alcohol content measured almost .25.
“My brother died because he was drunk,” Muir wrote in her memoir Wasted: A Story of Alcohol, Grief and a Death in Brisbane, “and because the drink made him stupid”…Since the age of 13, Alexander had been binge drinking – and getting into trouble for it. Muir recalls more than one occasion when she had to evade police questions regarding the whereabouts of her teenage brother.
For  complete article go to… https://www.theguardian.com/books/australia-books-blog/2016/jun/20/alcohol-was-there-always-elspeth-muir-on-her-brothers-death-and-australias-drinking-culture?subid=11911254&CMP=ema_632&utm_source=ADF+Master+List&utm_campaign=296567c5bf-GrogWatch_June_28_2016&utm_medium=email&utm_term=0_fe135ee49e-296567c5bf-297991633  

 


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Parents risky drinking encourages teens

Jun 21, 2016  by 21bethere


Risky drinking is defined as parents having five or more drinks on any occasion, at least two or three times a month. The study did not consider if the teens, aged 14 to 16, actually had to witness their parents' drinking.
And mothers seemed more influential. A quarter of teens whose mums drank at risky levels had sampled alcohol, compared with almost one in five teens whose fathers drank in the same way. About 16 per cent of children whose parents did drink not heavily, had tried alcohol.
While the research didn't show young teens were drinking in excess, it did show their friends were influential. Only 5 per cent of teens who had no friends who drank alcohol, had sampled it. But if they had at least one friend who drank, this rose to 40 per cent.
 
Complete article go to  http://www.theage.com.au/victoria/parents-risky-drinking-encourages-teens-20160619-gpmklw.html#ixzz4CAyomn1J      ...Read More

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Drinking during early to mid-adolescence can lead to vulnerability to chronic stress

May 25, 2016  by 21bethere

Drinking during early to mid-adolescence can lead to vulnerability to chronic stress, according to new research from Binghamton University, State University of New York.

A research team led by Linda Spear, distinguished professor of psychology at Binghamton University, gave alcohol to rats every other day, starting from early to mid-adolescence. When the team looked at the same rats in adulthood, they found that adult males didn't show hormonal stress adaptation, making them more vulnerable to chronic stress.
"Stress hormones are released when you get anxious or are in a stressful circumstance," said Spear. "The classic stress hormone is cortisol in humans; it's corticosterone in rats. When you expose the animals to a stressor, the first time they show a large hormone stress response. However, this hormonal response normally adapts over time, such that less hormone is released following repeated exposure to a relatively mild stressor. And that's important, because cortisol or corticosterone helps you respond to an emergency. But it's bad to have elevated levels in the long term, because sustained elevations in these levels of these hormones have adverse effects on a lot of body systems. So cortisol is needed for emergencies, but you don't want it elevated all the time. And what we found is that following adolescent alcohol exposure, adults don't show that hormonal stress adaptation. They don't adapt to the chronic stressor, which suggests that they may be more vulnerable later to chronic stress."
For complete article go to https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2016/05/160524121557.htm  

 


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Raising the legal drinking age

May 5, 2016  by 21bethere

  

 


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New Research Finds Laws that Effectively Reduce Underage Drinking Fatalities (MLDA Laws)

Apr 12, 2016  by 21bethere

New research reveals that nine laws designed to reduce underage drinking have been instrumental in saving more than 1,100 lives each year in the states that have adopted them, and that an additional 210 lives could be saved annually if they were adopted in every state, Medical News Today reports.
While all 50 states have adopted a minimum legal drinking age of 21, a large number of states have adopted expanded underage drinking laws. Those additional laws were the focus of research done by a team at the Pacific Institute for Research and Evaluation in Calverton, Maryland. The results were published in the March 2016 issue of the Journal of Studies on Alcohol and Drugs.
Of the 20 expanded underage drinking laws that were identified, nine were found to be particularly effective in reducing the number of fatal crashes involving underage drinking drivers:
·         possession of alcohol
·         purchase of alcohol
·         use alcohol and lose your license
·         zero tolerance .02 blood alcohol concentration limit for underage drivers
·         age of bartender 21 and older
·         state responsible beverage service program
·         fake identification support provisions for retailers
·         dram shop liability
·         and social host civil liability
The authors examined each law's strengths and weaknesses in terms of coverage, sanctions for violations, exceptions, and ease of enforcement. Results showed wide variability in the strength of each underage drinking law and in the number of states that have adopted them.
Lead author James Fell, now a principal research scientist at NORC at the University of Chicago, said their particular interest was in the nine laws that made a significant difference in the number of fatal crashes.
"We were surprised to find that half of the states have adopted 13 or fewer laws, that only five can be found in all 50 states and the District of Columbia, and that just one state, Utah, has adopted all 20," he said in a news release.
 
Assessing the Impact of Twenty Underage Drinking Laws
Journal of Studies on Alcohol and Drugs, 77(2), 249–260 (2016). 
James C. Fell, M.S.,a,* Michael Scherer, Ph.D.,a Sue Thomas, Ph.D.,a & Robert B. Voas, Ph.D.aAffiliations
aCalverton Center, Pacific Institute for Research and Evaluation, Calverton, Maryland
 
For complete paper go to http://www.jsad.com/doi/abs/10.15288/jsad.2016.77.249  

 


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Aust doctors want drinking age to rise

Apr 5, 2016  by 21bethere

A group of Australian doctors wants to see the legal drinking age increased to combat drunken violence.
In a submission to a senate inquiry into alcohol-fuelled violence, the Royal Australasian College of Physicians wants to see a new minimum purchase age for certain types of alcohol and for all takeaway alcohol…
 
For complete article go to
http://www.heraldsun.com.au/news/breaking-news/aust-doctors-want-drinking-age-increased/news-story/413d57a496bf930302b792bda6a08e1e  

 


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What is Secondary Supply Law?

Mar 16, 2016  by 21bethere

What is Secondary Supply Law?
 
Why is secondary supply important?
Secondary supply is one way that young people obtain alcohol. Almost 40 per cent of underage drinkers get alcohol from their parents, and only 5 per cent buy it themselves. So a good deal (55%) of underage drinking occurs when minors obtain alcohol from a person who is not their parent, guardian or carer.1
 
The National Health and Medical Research Council's Australian alcohol guidelines suggest that for people under 18 years of age, not drinking alcohol is the safest option.
 
There have been a number of cases in Australia where a person has suffered injuries or died as a result of drinking too much alcohol after being supplied with it by an adult who was not their parent. Regulating private supply of alcohol aims to stop that happening by deterring adults from supplying alcohol to young people without approval from the young people's parents.
For Complete data go to Australian Drug Foundation http://www.druginfo.adf.org.au/images/secondary-supply-16mar16.pdf  

 


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The Conversation heats up this April at Deakin University Burwood

Mar 9, 2016  by 21bethere

The Conversation heats up this April at Deakin University Burwood!
 
Our 21 Be There National Conversation engages audiences from all demographics with seminars, presentations, discussions, and from time to time debates. These fun but robust events are great opportunities to hear different perspectives on the important issue of the Minimum Legal Drinking Age.
 
It still surprises us, at times, who and who isn’t up for a rethink on this key public health issue! Come along and check it out!
 
If you can make it, come to THE WORLD CAFÉ FORUM on Tuesday April 12th 2016 situated at Burwood Corporate Centre – Level 2 Building BC (see reception for room details on the day)  

 


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Sober Just Sexy

Feb 8, 2016  by 21bethere

Sober Just Sexy !
Dry January is over, pay day is finally here, but not everyone in the UK is going to be hitting the bars hard, because there’s been an explosion in sobriety movements.
 
Going sober no longer resigns you to pints of cola or staying in. There are loads of new organisations, establishments, drink and even clothing brands looking to get in on the increasing number of people wanting to avoid the hard stuff - whether for a month or forever.
Which is great news! It’s never been easier it is for us to make clever, healthy choices whilst keeping our social life just as healthy and our drinks just as exciting.
If you’re tempted to try a new way of socialising, here’s our guide to the most exciting sober stuff around.
Seedlip - The world’s first non-alcoholic distilled spirit
Bottles of distilled spirits normally come with the words Gin, Vodka or Tequila stamped on them, so if you’ve had some horrific hangovers on the shots, Seedlip might be the alternative for you. Smokey, with clove and citrus tones this clear spirit has distillates of six botanicals – two barks, two spices and two citrus peels – all blended together without any alcohol or sugar. It’s perfect for a Virgin Expresso Martini or Dry Dirty Martini.
http://www.seedlipdrinks.com/
Dry Drinker - Interesting booze-free beers
If you’ve ever been the designated driver you may have tried a Becks Blue, the classic alcohol free beer that you can find in your average pub, but it’s hardly going to set your imagination on fire when the boozers are enjoying exotic and artisan beverages. Dry Drinker was founded by Stuart Elkington and Jon Bird who saw a gap in the market for a high quality low alcohol and alcohol free beers. Their tagline is “Sober Revolution” and while they both say they love nothing more than enjoying a non-alcoholic beer watching the football, going dry for them is definitely about being health conscious. You can buy mixed and single brand cases of beer from around the world including Super Rock, Erdinger and Jever Fun.
http://www.drydrinker.com/shop/
 
 
For complete article go to….http://www.elleuk.com/now-trending/sober-just-got-sexy#!  

 


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Their guidance makes it clear for the first time that there is no safe level of alcohol consumption

Feb 1, 2016  by 21bethere

Why ‘safe’ drinking really means no alcohol
The UK chief medical officers have just published updated alcohol consumption guidelines, following a two year, expert review of the scientific evidence.
Their guidance makes it clear for the first time that there is no “safe” level of alcohol consumption...
 
Any level of drinking raises the risk of developing a range of cancers including breast, bowel and mouth cancer. Although we have known that alcohol is a carcinogen (cancer causing substance) since the 1980s, the full extent of the link was not recognised in the previous recommended limits which were set out in 1995. There is also now no justification for recommending drinking on health grounds as previous evidence is likely to have over-estimated the protective effects of alcohol for the heart... Just because we don’t want to hear that something we enjoy carries health risks doesn’t alter the scientific evidence – there is no completely safe level of alcohol consumption. Imagine the public outrage if the government failed to inform people that a product which is cheap, widely available and constantly promoted also causes cancer, liver damage and cardiovascular disease.
 
Read more: http://www.scotsman.com/news/alison-douglas-why-safe-drinking-really-means-no-alcohol-1-4011182#ixzz3yyU89MML     ...Read More

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This mother drank while pregnant. Here’s what her daughter’s like at 43.

Jan 27, 2016  by 21bethere

This mother drank while pregnant. Here’s what her daughter’s like at 43.

Kathy Mitchell wants to share something with you. She's not proud of it, and it's not a behavior she hopes you'll emulate. It's just the truth: As a teen, Kathy drank alcohol while pregnant with her daughter, Karli. It was a perilous if unwitting mistake that has defined both of their lives….To Kathy, Karli's is simply a life snuffed of promise. "I adore my very sweet daughter," Kathy says. "She's a forever innocent child. But not a day goes by that I don't ask myself, 'What if? What if alcohol hadn't been a part of my life?' "
 
For complete story go to http://www.sbs.com.au/news/article/2016/01/20/mother-drank-while-pregnant-heres-what-her-daughters-43   ...Read More

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The density of alcohol outlets and adolescent alcohol consumption: An Australian longitudinal analysis

Jan 21, 2016  by 21bethere


*          B. Rowland, , Tracy Evans-Whipp,  Sheryl Hemphill, Rachel Leunga,
M. Livingstond,  J.W. Toumbouroua
doi:10.1016/j.healthplace.2015.11.004

________________________________________

Highlights

* Density of alcohol sales outlets in a given area provided a practical
measure of physical and social availability of alcohol.

* Higher levels on this measure predicted future increases in adolescent
alcohol use.

* There have been few previous longitudinal studies examining the
association between density of alcohol sales outlets and adolescent
consumption.

* The study contributes to increasing evidence that the density of alcohol
sales outlets is a risk factor for adolescent alcohol use.

________________________________________

Abstract

Higher density of alcohol outlets has been linked to increased levels of
adolescent alcohol-related behaviour. Research to date has been
cross-sectional. A longitudinal design using two waves of annual survey data
from the Australian arm of the International Youth Development Study was
used. The sample comprised 2835 individuals with average age at wave 2 of 14
years (SD=1.67; range=11-17 years). GSEM was used to examine how absolute
levels of alcohol outlet density was associated with student-reported
alcohol use one year later, while controlling for prior alcohol use, risk
factors at wave one and changes in density over the 2 years.



Adolescents' perception of alcohol availability and friends' alcohol use
were tested as potential mediators of the association between alcohol outlet
density and adolescent alcohol use. Elasticity modelling identified a 10%
increase in overall density at wave one was associated with an approximately
17% increase in odds of adolescent alcohol consumption at wave two. Living
in areas with a higher density of outlets was associated with a
statistically significant increase in the likelihood of adolescents
developing early age alcohol consumption.



For complete article go to ...
http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1353829215001513  

 


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The effects of random breath testing and lowering the minimum legal drinking age on traffic fatalities in Australian states.

Dec 23, 2015  by 21bethere

This study aims to apply time series analysis techniques to examine the effects of random breath testing (RBT) on three age-specific traffic fatalities in four Australian states while considering the effects of lowering the minimum legal drinking age (MLDA).

METHODS:
Long-term time series of age-specific traffic crash deaths in four Australian states were used to analyse the impact of RBT implementation while considering the population growth, increase in motor vehicle registrations and the effects of lowering the MLDA.

RESULTS:
The results of intervention analysis indicate that RBT has substantially reduced traffic fatalities in all four states since it was introduced, particularly among the 17-year-olds to 20-year-olds and 21-year-olds to 30-year-olds. New South Wales received the biggest total net effect from RBT implementation on traffic deaths. By contrast, RBT produced only a modest reduction in traffic fatalities among 30-year-olds to 39-year-olds. Lowering the MLDA was associated with significant increases in traffic fatalities among 17-year-olds to 39-year-olds in Queensland and Western Australia.

CONCLUSIONS:
Controlling for the declining trend in traffic fatalities, the effects of changes in the MLDA law, the implementation of RBT has generated a huge effect, preventing an estimated 5279 traffic crash deaths in four Australian states. This provides further evidence that the implementation of RBT and increases in the MLDA are effective policies for reducing traffic fatalities.

Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.  

 


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Does the social context of early alcohol use affect risky drinking in adolescents? Prospective cohort study

Nov 18, 2015  by 21bethere

Does the social context of early alcohol use affect risky drinking in adolescents? Prospective cohort study

Louisa Degenhardt1234*, Helena Romaniuk256, Carolyn Coffey2, Wayne D. Hall78, Wendy Swift1, John B. Carlin35, Christina O’Loughlin2 and George C. Patton26
*Corresponding author: Louisa Degenhardt [email protected]
Abstract
Background
There are limited longitudinal data on the associations between different social contexts of alcohol use and risky adolescent drinking.
 
Methods
Australian prospective longitudinal cohort of 1943 adolescents with 6 assessment waves at ages 14–17 years. Drinkers were asked where and how frequently they drank. Contexts were: at home with family, at home alone, at a party with friends, in a park/car, or at a bar/nightclub. The outcomes were prevalence and incidence of risky drinking (≥5 standard drinks (10g alcohol) on a day, past week) and very risky drinking (>20 standard drinks for males and >11 for females) in early (waves 1–2) and late (waves 3–6) adolescence.
 
Results
Forty-four percent (95 % CI: 41-46 %) reported past-week risky drinking on at least one wave during adolescence (waves 1–6). Drinking at a party was the most common repeated drinking context in early adolescence (28 %, 95 % CI 26-30 %); 15 % reported drinking repeatedly (3+ times) with their family in early adolescence (95 % CI: 14-17 %). For all contexts (including drinking with family), drinking 3+ times in a given context was associated with increased the risk of risky drinking in later adolescence. These effects remained apparent after adjustment for potential confounders (e.g. for drinking with family, adjusted RR 1.9; 95 % CI: 1.5-2.4). Similar patterns were observed for very risky drinking.
 
Conclusions
Our results suggest that consumption with family does not protect against risky drinking. Furthermore, parents who wish to minimise high risk drinking by their adolescent children might also limit their children’s opportunities to consume alcohol in unsupervised settings.
 
Read more at http://www.biomedcentral.com/1471-2458/15/1137?utm_source=ADF+Master+List&utm_campaign=24417d4d65-druginfo_nov_1811_18_2015&utm_medium=email&utm_term=0_fe135ee49e-24417d4d65-297991633   ...Read More

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Adolescent Alcohol Activates Hippocampal Astrocytes in Adulthood

Nov 16, 2015  by 21bethere

NIAAA-supported researchers at the Duke University and Durham Veterans Affairs Medical Centers continue to refine our understanding of how repeated exposure to alcohol during adolescence causes long-lasting structural and functional abnormalities in the brain.  Earlier this year, Duke scientists led by Dr. Mary-Louise Risher looked at how alcohol affects the hippocampus, a region of the brain associated with memory and learning, by exposing adolescent rats to alcohol in a way that modeled the intermittent, high-dose alcohol use typically seen among adolescent humans.  They found that neurons in the adolescent hippocampus are vulnerable to alcohol-induced damage, with pathological changes that impair memory-related brain function into adulthood.

http://www.spectrum.niaaa.nih.gov/news-from-the-field/news-from-the-field-01.html  

 


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Sunday afternoon cricket - National Television – A crowd shot appears on the screen and holds for quite a while, and the commentators ‘wax lyrical’ about kids enjoying the cricket…

Nov 16, 2015  by 21bethere


Sunday afternoon cricket - National Television – A crowd shot appears on the screen and holds for quite a while, and the commentators ‘wax lyrical’ about kids enjoying the cricket…
 
But check out the camera angle, the staging of the young people, the background they chose to use!  To quote the verbose sports commentator Bruce McAvaney - “Cleverrrrr!”
 
Is it an unabashed booze broadcasting binge by Channel 9  or just a brain fade? Hmmm, the sceptic in us sees a little too much choreography to be a simple brain fade! 
 
With pressure coming from many quarters to ban advertising of alcohol in both sport and media, the industry and their collaborators in cash flow conscription will engage surreptitious, and even blatant methods to achieve their promotional end. The alcohol industry knows (as do all product promoters) that if you’re going to be in business in 20 years’ time you NEED to market to kids.
 
“$130 million is the annual spend on alcohol industry advertising in Australia… $90 million annual alcohol sponsorship of sport in Australia.” 1
 
One policy change can not only militate against  this, but add even greater efficacy to other demand reduction policy drivers such as pricing and taxation, is raising the Minimum Legal Drinking Age back to 21. This measure will aid and abet policy makers, parents and promoters in better managing the push for early uptake of alcohol.
 
21 Be There Team.
    ...Read More

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New Dutch healthy diet guidelines say dont drink alcohol at all Health

Nov 5, 2015  by 21bethere

The Dutch health council is recommending that people abstain from alcohol altogether or drink no more than one glass per day. Previously women are advised to drink no more than one glass and men two on a daily basis. The council has published new recommendations on ensuring a healthy diet and says more than one alcoholic drink raises the risk of strokes and various forms of cancer. The health benefits of drinking wine, for example, do not outweigh the negatives, the council says.

Read more at DutchNews.nl: New Dutch healthy diet guidelines say don’t drink alcohol at all 
http://www.dutchnews.nl/news/archives/2015/11/new-dutch-healthy-eating-guidelines-say-dont-drink-alcohol-at-all/  

 


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How adverts fuel underage drinking: Teenagers are FIVE times more likely to buy alcohol after seeing it promoted on TV

Oct 29, 2015  by 21bethere

How adverts fuel underage drinking: Teenagers are FIVE times more likely to buy alcohol after seeing it promoted on TV

'Strong link' between what under 18s saw on TV and alcohol consumption 
Study found young people are also influenced by magazine adverts and were 36 per cent more likely to drink alcohol if they read about it
Doctors: Alcohol abuse among the young is 'major public health problem' 


By DANIEL BATES FOR THE DAILY MAIL PUBLISHED: 04:37 EST, 23 October 2015 | UPDATED: 11:30 EST, 23 October 2015
 
Underage drinkers are more than five times more likely to buy alcohol after seeing it advertised on TV, a study has found.
Researchers discovered a strong link between what the under 18s saw on television and how they drank in the month afterwards.
They were also influenced by magazine adverts and were 36 per cent more likely to drink alcohol if they read about it.
The study said that alcohol abuse among the young is a ‘major public health problem’ that needs to be addressed.


Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/health/article-3285061/How-adverts-fuel-underage-drinking-Teenagers-FIVE-times-likely-buy-alcohol-seeing-promoted-TV.html#ixzz3q1AIughk   

 


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Improving Social Norms Interventions: Rank-Framing Increases Excessive Alcohol Drinkers’ Information-Seeking (University Students)

Oct 29, 2015  by 21bethere

Key points From summary and commentary

"Social norm’ interventions aim to reduce consumption by telling heavy drinkers how their drinking compares to the norm, correcting overestimations of how much others drink. A randomised British trial among college students made this comparison in two ways: comparing against average drinking of same-sex students, or ranking (e.g., ‘More than 80% of other students’) against the same benchmark. Though relative to other types of messages the ranking comparison did not reduce drinking over the following month, it did stimulate requests to find out more about alcohol and how they can get help"
 
Students at two British universities were invited to join the study through email and university social media. Of the 146 who responded and completed baseline assessments, 101 were drinking excessively according to their answers to the three questions of the AUDIT-C screening questionnaire. Students were then randomly allocated to be sent one of four sets of four weekly messages containing one of the types of information described above. When comparisons were made, it was against the drinking of all 146 students, including those who did not screen as risky drinkers.
A month later 78 of the 101 heavy-drinking students responded to a follow-up assessment including questions about of their drinking in the previous week, and were offered the opportunity to seek further information in the form of expert recommendations on alcohol consumption, links to web sites about alcohol consumption, or contact details of services for people worried about their own or someone else’s drinking.

 
For complete Findings go to… http://findings.org.uk/PHP/dl.php?file=Taylor_MJ_1.cab&s=db  

 


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UW research leads to new recommendation against drinking while pregnant

Oct 27, 2015  by 21bethere

SEATTLE – Research from the University of Washington's Fetal Alcohol Syndrome program helped lead to a new recommendation that no amount of alcohol should be considered safe during pregnancy. That recommendation came last week from the American Academy of Pediatrics.
 
"It just sounds ultra-conservative. But when it comes to alcohol I cannot stress enough if you have the ability to not drink at all during pregnancy, don't drink at all. It's just not worth the risk," said Dr. Susan Astley, a UW Professor of Epidemiology and Pediatrics.
 
UW doctors have been at the forefront of studying and diagnosing Fetal Alcohol Syndrome. A chief resident first discovered the syndrome back in 1968 and the term Fetal Alcohol Syndrome was coined at UW Medical Center in 1973.
 
For decades, doctors and researchers like Astley have been studying the long term effects when moms drink while pregnant. Astley says when fetuses are exposed to alcohol it can alter their normal development. Symptoms of Fetal Alcohol Syndrome range from growth deficiencies or minor facial anomalies to structural or functional brain damage. Some children and teens have attention deficit or memory problems.  

For complete article go to…
http://www.king5.com/story/news/health/2015/10/26/uw-research-leads-new-recommendation-against-drinking-while-pregnant/74616394/  

 


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New beer behemoth a serious threat to global health and sustainable development

Oct 14, 2015  by 21bethere

Stockholm, Sweden -- Anheuser-Busch InBev and SABMiller, the two biggest beer producers in the world, have agreed on terms for a gigantic deal to merge both companies. The merger is set to create a beer behemoth responsible for one in three beers sold worldwide.
The final AB InBev offer is worth more than $110 billion. Key actor in the deal making and major profiteer is the tobacco industry giant Altria, which is SABMiller’s biggest shareholder, owning a 27% stake. Altria, the manufacturer of Marlboro cigarettes and formerly known as Philip Morris Companies, is predicted to receive seats on the board of directors of the new beer behemoth.
The Financial Times reports that if completed, the deal — including debt — would be the third largest M&A transaction in history, overtaking AOL’s purchase of Time Warner in 2000.
This deal has to be viewed as a major threat to global health and sustainable development
 
The merger marks another aggressive step by Big Alcohol to target emerging markets in Africa and Asia.

"The troika of two Big Alcohol giants plus the Big Tobacco giant Altria spells trouble for people in developing countries and for the newly adopted Agenda2030,” cautions Kristina Sperkova, President of IOGT International, the premier global network for evidence-based policy measures and community-based interventions to prevent and reduce alcohol harm.

"The track record of Big Tobacco is well documented and well know. And AB InBev and SABMiller have each similarly scary track records of unethical practices putting profit over Human Rights,” says Ms. Sperkova.
 
Alcohol kills 3.3 million people worldwide, every year.
For full IOGT article go to http://us2.campaign-archive1.com/?u=208eb41381d07b9517fc37d74&id=ce2beb965e&e=831ec98e91   ...Read More

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Legal drinking age of 18 tied to high school dropout rate

Sep 29, 2015  by 21bethere

JOURNAL OF STUDIES ON ALCOHOL AND DRUGS
 
Piscataway, NJ - Although there have been calls to lower the legal drinking age from 21, a new study
raises the possibility that it could have the unintended effect of boosting the high school dropout
rate.
The report, published in the September issue of the Journal of Studies on Alcohol and Drugs, looked
back at high school dropout rates in the 1970s to mid-80s -- a time when many U.S. states lowered
the age at which young people could legally buy alcohol.
Researchers found that when the minimum drinking age was lowered to 18, high school dropout
rates rose by 4 to 13 percent, depending on the data source. Black and Hispanic students -- who
were already more vulnerable to dropping out -- appeared more affected than white students.
For complete article go to….
http://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2015-09/joso-lda092115.php  

 


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TALKING POINT - ALCOHOL AND OTHER DRUG SEMINAR SERIES

Sep 24, 2015  by 21bethere

Turning Point logo
 
TALKING POINT 
ALCOHOL AND OTHER DRUG SEMINAR SERIES
 
Two sides of the story: Research with Parents and Adolescents on the supply of alcohol 
Professor Sandra JonesAustralian Catholic University 

Date:     Thursday 29 October 2015
Venue:  142 Gertrude Street, Fitzroy
Time:    1:00pm – 2:00pm EST, Please allow time for parking, arrival 12:45pm

Professor Sandra Jones is an ARC Future Fellow and Director of the Centre for Health and Social Research (CHaSR) at the Australian Catholic University in Melbourne. For more than a decade Sandra has been conducting research into the influences on young people’s alcohol consumption, including alcohol advertising and marketing; and her ARC Future Fellowship is a four-year whole of community intervention to address social norms around underage drinking. Sandra’s career research funding exceeds $8 million; and she has published more than 150 refereed journal articles, six book chapters, and numerous policy-related monographs and reports. She is also a member of a range of policy and advocacy committees and professional organisations in Australia and overseas.

Research with children and adolescents consistently shows that kids get their alcohol from their parents. Research with parents consistently shows that parents don’t give their kids alcohol. Does that mean someone isn’t telling the truth?
 
This seminar will provide a summary of findings from a series of research projects we have conducted with parents that go some way to explaining the conflicting perspectives on parents’ provision of alcohol to their teenagers.
 
The parent studies include: a CATI survey (n=900); an online survey (n=104); focus groups (n=27); and a projective study (n=180). In combination the studies identified a nuanced interpretation of the ‘supply’ of alcohol (it doesn’t mean what you think it means); complex trade-offs between perceived risks and benefits of allowing adolescents to drink; powerful social norms (which concurrently encourage and discourage parents from providing alcohol); and a consistent ‘othering’ of problematic adolescent drinking and parental supply.

 
 

There is no cost to attend or view online the Talking Point's Seminar Series.
Registrations are essential. Please register here and select if you are attending in person or viewing online in real time.
Please register by 27 October 2015.

If you have any enquiries about the event please contact Ann Rosman on (03) 8413 8478
  

 


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Pinkwashed alcohol products & promotions exposed in new study

Sep 23, 2015  by 21bethere

SAN FRANCISCO, Sept. 14, 2015 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- 

A new study in the October issue of Addiction documents alcohol products promoted with pink ribbons, partnerships with breast cancer charities, and general terms such as "breast cancer research" or "cure."

Hundreds of brands promote products with breast cancer awareness ribbons, and when companies that make products that contribute to cancer do so, it is called pinkwashing. 

Ironically, pinkwashed alcohol brands contribute to cancer risk in the name of research, treatment, and/or prevention. 

Pinkwashed drinks extend the potential to increase sales of a carcinogen by linking an iconic charitable cause and entire populations of women, including young women who may already drink at higher levels.

"Pinkwashed alcohol products and promotions under the breast cancer awareness credo devalue and undermine the vital work of cancer charities," stated Sarah Mart, research director at Alcohol Justice and coauthor of the study. 

"As a public health standard, breast cancer awareness should be clearly separate from alcohol marketing."

 
For Full article go to http://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/pinkwashed-alcohol-products--promotions-exposed-in-new-study-300142580.html?__scoop_post=24af0d10-5b63-11e5-9e47-00221934899c&__scoop_topic=3296145#__scoop_post=24af0d10-5b63-11e5-9e47-00221934899c&__scoop_topic=3296145   ...Read More

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Victoria needs to lift it’s game!

Sep 16, 2015  by 21bethere

DRINKING AGE LAWS IN AUSTRALIA

Downloaded information 17 August 2015 

http://www.lawstuff.org.au/act_law/topics/Alcohol 

Victoria is the only state in Australia where it is legal for an under 18 to drink alcohol in 

a licensed premise.

ACT 

If you are under 18, it is against the law for you to drink, obtain, or be given alcohol on 

licensed premises. It is against the law for an under 18 to be on licensed premises unless with 

a parent or someone else responsible for them. 

•If you’re under 18, it’s against the law to be on licensed premises unless you're with a parent 

or someone else responsible for you.

•If you’re caught breaking the law, you can be fined, given a caution or warning.

•There are no laws that make it a crime to drink alcohol on private premises BUT if you’re 

having a party it’s a good idea to get permission from the parents of anyone who is under 18.

Drinking on licensed premises

 Licensed premises are public places that have been given a license by the government to sell 

or serve alcohol.  These include bottle shops, pubs, bars, clubs, and some restaurants (called 

licensed restaurants).

 If you are under 18, it is against the law for you to drink, obtain, or be given alcohol on 

licensed premises.  It doesn’t matter if you are with your parent or guardian.  If you are 

caught, you can be:

•given a warning, a formal caution, or choose to go to court (which may fine you $750). 

The police decide which penalty to apply, but you can always choose to go to court instead.

NSW 

If you are under 18, it is against the law for you to drink, obtain, or be given alcohol on 

licensed premises. If you’re under 18, it’s against the law to be on licensed premises unless 

you’re with a parent. 

•If you’re under 18, it’s against the law for you to buy alcohol. It’s also against the law to use 

a fake ID to try and buy alcohol or get into a pub, club or bar.

•If you’re under 18, it’s against the law to be on licensed premises unless you’re with a 

parent, and even then you’re not allowed to drink.

•If you’re caught breaking the law, you could be fined, given a caution or warning.

•There are no laws that make it a crime to drink alcohol supplied by your parents in a private 

home BUT your parents can get into trouble unless they get permission from the parents of 

anyone who is under 18.

Drinking on licensed premises

Licensed premises are public places that have been given a license by the government to sell 

or serve alcohol. These include bottle shops, pubs, bars, clubs, and some restaurants (called 

licensed restaurants).

If you are under 18, it is against the law for you to drink, obtain, or be given alcohol on 

licensed premises. It doesn’t matter if you are with your parent or guardian. If you are caught, 

you can be given a warning, a formal caution, fined on the spot ($220), or choose to go to 

court.

The police decide which penalty to apply, but you can always choose to go to court instead.

Remember, it’s against the law for you to even be on licensed premises (say a pub, club or 

bar) unless you are under the care of a parent or responsible adult.

NORTHERN TERITORRY 

It is against the law for under 18s to drink on licensed premises 

Drinking on licensed premises

Licensed premises are public places that have been given a license by the government to sell 

or serve alcohol.  These include bottle shops, pubs, bars, clubs, and some restaurants (called 

licensed restaurants).

If you are under 18, it is against the law for you to be on licensed premises unless you are 

with your parent or guardian. It’s also against the law for you to drink on licensed premises, 

even if you are with your parents. If you are caught, you can be: 

•given a warning or sent to a Youth Justice Conference; or

•be fined $298 on the spot by the police; or

•choose to go to court (which may fine you $2,980).

QUEENSLAND 

If you are under 18, it is against the law for you to drink or have alcohol on licensed 

premises. If you’re under 18, it’s against the law to be on licensed premises unless you’re 

with a parent. 

•If you’re under 18, it’s against the law for you to buy alcohol. It’s also against the law to use 

a fake ID to try and buy alcohol or get into a pub, club or bar.

•If you’re under 18, it’s against the law to be on licensed premises unless you’re with a 

parent, and even then you can’t drink.

•If you’re caught breaking the law, you could be fined, given a caution or warning.

•There are no laws that make it a crime to drink alcohol supplied by your parents in a private 

home BUT if you’re having a party and serving alcohol to under 18s, you generally need 

permission from people’s parents.

Drinking on licensed premises

Licensed premises are public places that have been given a license by the government to sell 

or serve alcohol. These include bottle shops, pubs, bars, clubs, and some restaurants (called 

licensed restaurants).

If you are under 18, it is against the law for you to drink or have alcohol on licensed 

premises. It doesn’t matter if you are with your parent or guardian. If you are caught, you can 

be:

•given a warning;

•given a formal caution; 

•fined on the spot ($341); or

•choose to go to court. 

The police decide which penalty to apply, but you can always choose to go to court instead.

You are breaking the law just by being on licensed premises (like in a pub, club or bar) if you 

are under 18, unless:

•  you are with a responsible adult (like a parent or guardian); or

•  you are eating a meal.

You can be fined $341 on the spot by the police if you are caught.

SOUTH AUSTRALIA 

If you are under 18, it is against the law for you to drink, get, or be given alcohol while you 

are on licensed premises. If you’re under 18, it’s against the law to be on licensed premises 

unless you’re with a parent. 

•If you’re under 18, it’s against the law for you to buy alcohol. It’s also against the law to use 

a fake ID to try and buy alcohol or get into a pub, club or bar.

•If you’re under 18, it’s against the law to be on licensed premises unless you’re with a 

parent, and even then you can’t drink.

•If you’re caught breaking the law, you could be fined, given an informal caution or a formal 

caution.

•There are no laws that make it a crime to drink alcohol in a private home BUT if you’re 

having a party it’s a good idea to get permission from people’s parents if you are serving 

alcohol anyone under 18.

Drinking on licensed premises

Licensed premises are public places that have been given a license by the government to sell 

or serve alcohol. These include bottle shops, pubs, bars, clubs, and some restaurants (called 

licensed restaurants).

If you are under 18, it is against the law for you to even be on licensed premises:

•with an entertainment venue licence between 9pm and 5am of the next day.

•be on any other licensed premises between midnight and 5am (except for example, in a 

dining room) if liquor may be sold in the area at that time.

If you are under 18, it’s also against the law for you to drink, get, or be given alcohol while 

you are there. It doesn’t matter if you are with your parent or guardian. You can be given a 

warning, caution, or sent to Youth Court if you have been caught before.

TASMANIA 

If you are under 18, it is against the law for you to drink, have, or be given alcohol in these 

places, even if you’re with your parents. You’re also not allowed to even be there unless it’s a 

specially signposted area and you’re either having a meal or with your parents.

•If you’re under 18, it’s against the law for you to buy alcohol. It’s also against the law to use 

a fake ID to try and buy alcohol or get into a pub, club or bar.

•If you’re under 18, it’s generally against the law to be on licensed premises.

•If you’re caught breaking the law, you could be fined, given a caution or warning.

•There are no laws that make it a crime to drink alcohol supplied by your parents in a private 

home BUT if you’re having a party and serving alcohol to under 18’s, you need permission 

from people’s parents.

Drinking on licensed premises

Licensed premises are public places that have been given a license by the government to sell 

or serve alcohol. These include bottle shops, pubs, bars, clubs, and some restaurants (called 

licensed restaurants).

If you are under 18, it is against the law for you to drink, have, or be given alcohol in these 

places, even if you’re with your parents. You’re also not allowed to even be there unless it’s a 

specially signposted area and you’re either having a meal or with your parents. If you are 

caught, you can be:

•given a warning, a formal caution, or choose to go to court (where you may be fined up to 

$1,400 if convicted).

It is up to the police whether to give you a warning or caution.

VICTORIA 

If you are under 18, it is against the law for you to drink, buy, or be given alcohol on licensed 

premises, unless you are drinking while having a meal; and you are with your parent, 

guardian or husband or wife (who is at least 18). 

•If you’re under 18, it’s against the law for you to buy alcohol. It’s also against the law to use 

a fake ID to try and buy alcohol or get into a pub, club or bar.

•If you’re under 18, it’s against the law to even be on licensed premises unless you’re with a 

parent or having a meal.

•If you’re caught breaking the law, you could be fined, given a caution or warning. 

•There are no laws that make it a crime to drink alcohol supplied by your parents in a private 

home BUT if you’re having a party and serving alcohol to under 18s, you need permission 

from people’s parents.

Drinking on licensed premises

Licensed premises are public places that have been given a license by the government to sell 

or serve alcohol. These include bottle shops, pubs, bars, clubs, and most restaurants 

(including BYO restaurants where people bring their own alcohol).

If you are under 18, it is against the law for you to drink, buy, or be given alcohol on licensed 

premises, unless:

•you are drinking while having a meal; and

•you are with your parent, guardian or husband or wife (who is at least 18).

 It’s also against the law for you to even be on licensed premises unless:

•you’re having a meal; or

•you’re with a parent, guardian or husband or wife (who is at least 18); or

•if you’re at a restaurant/café with a liquor licence and it’s between 7am and 11pm Monday 

to Saturday or between 10am and 11pm on Sundays. 

Otherwise, if you are caught, you can be:

? given a warning, a formal caution, 

? fined on the spot ($73.80),

? or choose to go to court.

The police decide which penalty to apply, but you can always choose to go to court instead. 

The alcohol can also be confiscated by the police.

WESTERN AUSTRALIA 

If you are under 18, it is against the law for you to drink, get, or be given alcohol on licensed 

premises. It doesn’t matter if you are with your parent or guardian. If you’re under 18, it’s 

against the law to be on licensed premises unless you’re with a parent. 

•If you’re under 18, it’s against the law for you to buy alcohol. It’s also against the law to use 

a fake ID to try and buy alcohol or get into a pub, club or bar.

•If you’re under 18, it’s against the law to be on licensed premises unless you’re with a 

parent, and even then you’re not allowed to drink.

•If you’re caught breaking the law, you can be fined, given a caution or warning.

•There are no laws that make it a crime to drink alcohol on private premises BUT if you’re 

having a party it’s a good idea to get permission from the parents of anyone who is under 18.

Drinking on licensed premises

Licensed premises are public places that have been given a license by the government to sell 

or serve alcohol. These include bottle shops, pubs, bars, clubs, and some restaurants (called 

licensed restaurants).

If you are under 18, it is against the law for you to drink, get, or be given alcohol on licensed 

premises. It doesn’t matter if you are with your parent or guardian. If you are caught, you can 

be:

•get warning, a formal caution from the police; or

•get a $200 fine on the spot from police; or

•choose to have the matter decided by a court (which may fine you up to $2,000 if you are 

convicted).

The police decide which penalty to apply, but you can always choose to go to court instead.

Remember, it’s also against the law for you to even be on licensed premises (say a pub, club 

or bar) unless you are under the care of a parent or responsible adult or you’re having a meal, 

or if it’s a licensed restaurant and you are there to have a meal.   ...Read More

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Potential role of adolescent alcohol exposure-induced amygdaloid histone modifications in anxiety and alcohol intake during adulthood

Jul 5, 2015  by 21bethere

AIE also induced anxiety-like behaviors and enhanced ethanol intake in adulthood, which was attenuated by TSA treatment via normalization of deficits in histone H3 acetylation of BDNF and Arc genes. These novel results indicate that AIE induces long-lasting effects on histone modifications and deficits in synaptic events in the amygdala, which are associated with anxiety-like and alcohol drinking behaviors in adulthood.

http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0969996115000911  

 


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Alcohol-related injuries in young women skyrocket, study finds

Jun 23, 2015  by 21bethere

The number of women presenting at emergency departments with alcohol-related injuries is increasing at an alarming rate, a new national study has found.
 
Between 2005 and 2012 the number of women who arrived at hospital with these kind of injuries increased by 44 per cent compared to 30 percent for men.
 
The sharpest rise in these presentations was in girls aged 15 to 19, which increased by more than 60 per cent from 4.6 per 1000 presentations to 7.5 per 1000.
 
For complete article go to http://www.smh.com.au/national/alcoholrelated-injuries-in-young-women-skyrocket-study-finds-20150620-ght25z.html?utm_source=ADF+Master+List&utm_campaign=08e7d75625-GrogWatch_23_June6_23_2015&utm_medium=email&utm_term=0_fe135ee49e-08e7d75625-297991633
 
© SMH: Nicky Phillips - Science Editor   ...Read More

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Top doctors call for drinking age to raise to 20

May 19, 2015  by 21bethere

Top New Zealand doctors are calling for the drinking age to be raised to 20 and booze sponsorship banned from public events in a push to reduce alcohol-related harm.
 
The New Zealand Medical Association released its Reducing Alcohol-Related Harm policy briefing today.
 
Read more…  Go to NEW ZEALAND HERALD @ http://www.nzherald.co.nz/lifestyle/news/article.cfm?c_id=6&objectid=11451264  

 


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Magistrate wants booze tax to tackle domestic violence

May 3, 2015  by 21bethere


http://www.couriermail.com.au/news/queensland/magistrate-wants-booze-tax-to-tackle-domestic-violence/story-fnihsrf2-1227330858533

A MAGISTRATE says government taxes on alcohol should be put towards funding anti-domestic violence programs, even if it means increasing booze prices.

Kingaroy magistrate Simon Young said domestic violence in some Queensland communities was 100 per cent ­alcohol-related, while in others it might be a “still significant” 30 per cent. Mr Young said it was dis­appointing that a Special Taskforce into Domestic and Family Violence report downplayed the role of alcohol in the commission of domestic violence.

 
21 Be There Comment: Sure, no doubt  such a move will help raise money to fund the damage already done - A consumption tax on luxury items (particularly those psychotropic toxins of a carcinogenic nature) is always a smart option, but demand drivers still need to be addressed.
One of the biggest drivers for acute episodic drinking, as well as a significant contributor to chronic long term alcohol use, is early uptake. 

Raising the Minimum Legal Drinking Age to 21 will be an effective pre-emptive 'strike' on this demand driver!   

 


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Binge drinking as a teenager can damage the brain for LIFE

Apr 30, 2015  by 21bethere

Binge drinking as a teenager can damage the brain for LIFE: Alcohol triggers changes to the regions affecting memory and learning

·        Alcohol exposure in adolescence can cause enduring abnormalities

·        Can have detrimental effect on a person's memory and ability to learn

·        And scientists warn binge drinking could also slow emotional maturity

By LIZZIE PARRY FOR MAILONLINE  PUBLISHED: 02:03 EST, 28 April 2015 | UPDATED: 08:49 EST, 28 April 2015

Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/health/article-3057670/Binge-drinking-teenager-damage-brain-LIFE-Alcohol-triggers-changes-regions-affecting-memory-learning.html#ixzz3Yr565Wfi   

“The study, published April 27 in the journal Alcoholism: Clinical & Experimental Research, provides new insights at the cellular level for how alcohol exposure during adolescence, before the brain is fully developed, can result in cellular and synaptic abnormalities that have enduring, detrimental effects on behavior.

"In the eyes of the law, once people reach the age of 18, they are considered adult, but the brain continues to mature and refine all the way into the mid-20s," said lead author Mary-Louise Risher, Ph.D., a post-doctoral researcher in the Duke Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences. "It's important for young people to know that when they drink heavily during this period of development, there could be changes occurring that have a lasting impact on memory and other cognitive functions.":

http://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2015-04/dumc-yab042215.php   ...Read More

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Peeling Back the Label on Branding Booze to Youth

Apr 22, 2015  by 21bethere

?ONLINE and CLUELESS?
Responses to an on-line “Alcohol Ads and You” survey by more than 2,300 children and young people in the UK and Wales, show that overall, under 18’s are not fully aware that some forms of ‘below the line’ alcohol promotion are in fact advertising the use of alcohol. For example,
•         Only 48.6% recognised that joining a Facebook group for an alcohol product was marketing alcohol
•         Only 50.4% recognised sponsorship of sports team shirts as alcohol marketing (note: young people who own alcohol merchandise such as T-shirts and baseball caps are 1.5 times more likely to try drinking alcohol than those who don’t)
•         Only 48.3% recognised a festival named after a product as alcohol marketing
•         Only 51% recognised a piece of alcohol product merchandise as alcohol marketing
•         Only 43.4% recognised brand ambassadors (people paid to promote brands at events) as alcohol marketing. 1
 
Big Bucks Being Spent on Booze Branding!
·         $130 million is the annual spend on alcohol industry advertising in Australia…
·         $90 million annual alcohol sponsorship of sport in Australia.2
 
The games being played!
“However, the internal planning documents for the campaign state categorically that “Carling celebrates, initiates and promotes the togetherness of the pack, their passions and their pint because Carling understands that things are better together”.
They go on to specify “Three Aspects of ‘Belonging’”…
·         Initiation: Expressions of the moment when an individual joins a group and finds a happy home in the pack – The Moment of Belonging.
·         Celebration: An expression of the sheer joy of belonging – The Joy of Belonging.
·         Contagion: An expression of the magnetic power of the group – The Power of Belonging”.
The documents proceed to emphasise the importance of advertising in getting these themes across: “Broadly speaking each piece of communication will either; celebrate ‘Join Us’, by championing the benefit of togetherness, or facilitate ‘Join Us’, by providing and enhancing experiences where togetherness is key”. 3
 
DRR Alcohol Advertising and Young PDF  

References
1 Overexposed and overlooked: Young people’s views on the regulation of alcohol promotion  Published by Alcohol Concern, 64 Leman Street, London E1 8EU
2  ‘Community Hangover’ Seminars Nathan Hawkins, Director ADRA (Ph D Candidate University Newcastle) AHA Conference Aug 2012
3 Memorandum by Professor Gerard Hastings, Institute for Social Marketing, University of Stirling & the Open University (AL 81) “They’ll Drink Bucket Loads of the Stuff” An Analysis of Internal Alcohol Industry Advertising Documents pp1-2   ...Read More

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Long-term effects of minimum legal drinking age laws on marijuana and other illicit drug use in adulthood.

Apr 12, 2015  by 21bethere

Authors
Krauss MJ1, Cavazos-Rehg PA2, Agrawal A3, Bierut LJ2, Grucza RA2.
Abstract
BACKGROUND:
Exposure to permissive minimum legal drinking age (MLDA) laws (ability to purchase alcohol <21 years) during adolescence can have long-term effects, including heavy alcohol use or alcohol use disorders as adults. We examined whether exposure to permissive MLDA laws during adolescence has long-term effects on illicit drug use and disorders in adulthood.
 
METHODS:
Participants from the 2004-2012 National Survey of Drug Use and Health (NSDUH) were linked with historical state MLDA laws. Participants born in 1949-1972 (age 31-63 years at observation, n=110,300) were analyzed because they came of legal age for alcohol purchase when changes occurred in state MLDA laws. Logistic regression was used to model drug use measures as a function of exposure to permissive MLDA during adolescence, adjusting for state and birth-year fixed effects, demographics, and salient state characteristics.
 
RESULTS:
Rates of past month use, past year use, and abuse/dependence of marijuana were 4.7%, 7.8%, and 1.2%, respectively. Rates of past month use, past year use, and abuse/dependence of illicit drugs other than marijuana were 2.9%, 6.2%, and 0.7%, respectively. Among the full sample, exposure to permissive MLDA laws was not significantly associated with drug use or abuse/dependence in adulthood. Men exposed to permissive MLDA laws were at 20% increased odds of past year illicit drug use (aOR 1.20, 95% CI 1.09-1.32).
 
CONCLUSIONS:
Restricting alcohol access during adolescence did not increase long-term drug use. Allowing the purchase of alcohol among those less than 21 years of age could increase the risk of drug use later in life.
For Full paper go to…. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25707705    

 


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An interesting video on problems non-drinkers face...

Apr 7, 2015  by 21bethere

  

 


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Raising the legal drinking age - A strategy worthy of consideration

Mar 17, 2015  by 21bethere

The latest research paper by FARE (The hidden harm: Alcohol’s impact on children and families) 

reports that over 1 million children in Australia are negatively affected by someone else’s alcohol 

consumption.1 Realising that the overall alcohol consumption levels in Australia has not increased 

significantly over the last 20 years, it is then quite alarming that the various harms associated with 

alcohol consumption has increased.  In Victoria between 2000 and 2008 alcohol-involved ambulance 

presentations increased by some 167% .2 It is time for the Federal Government to take a serious look 

at cost effective measures to reduce alcohol harm in this nation.  Research has provided the answer 

to this question now for many years and the best measures include: Standardising alcohol taxation, 

restricting alcohol advertising, restriction hours of opening similar to the successful policy in NSW 

and increasing the drinking age to 21.  

The research is quite clear on the question of raising the drinking age and points to significant 

increases in health and significant decreases in harms for both individuals and the community.  

When governments at both State and Commonwealth levels are struggling with tough budget 

decisions, reducing overall alcohol harms will produce significant costs savings as well as reducing 

the demands of our hospitals. The Newcastle experiment when the earlier closing hours was 

introduced proved that strategic policy changes can be extremely cost effective and have significant 

- up to 80% - reductions in alcohol-fuelled street violence. I am suggesting that raising the drinking 

age to 21 is another strategy where this policy will bring about immediate reductions in alcohol 

related harm in the 18- 21 year olds.  

Some of the immediate benefits would be a reduction in binge drinking, motor vehicle accidents 

associated with alcohol, suicides, street violence as well as an improvement in the overall long term 

health prospects for this population.  The argument is whether any government will have the 

political will to introduce a significant health policy that is opposed by the demographic it seeks to 

support. The majority of Australians appear to be in favour of this measure, as young people are 

considered our greatest asset.  Furthermore, as a community, we all need to do whatever we can to 

ensure young people have the opportunity to grow and mature in a safe nurturing environment. 

Dennis Young – CEO, Drug Arm, QLD

1. The hidden harm: Alcohol’s impact on children and families FARE 2015 

2. Diverging trends in alcohol consumption and alcohol-related harm in Victoria. ANZ Journal of 

Public Health 2010  

 


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Game Changer

Jan 20, 2015  by 21bethere

It is with pleasure that I write this blog and express my journey with alcohol.

My name is Aaron Schultz. I am 43 years old father of two boys and live in Hobart Tasmania.

It has only been of recent times that I have felt comfortable talking about my experience with alcohol largely due to the cultural influence it has on our nation. I would like to share my story with you from where it all began until now.

I was born and raised in a country town in Western Victoria called Horsham. I am the only child of parents who brought me into this world in their 40’s, something that was relatively unheard of in those days. My father was a painter at the local hospital and my mother was a home mum after spending many years working as a seamstress.

At the age of three I had a fall in the backyard and subsequently developed a tumor on the brain which resulted in me spending four months in Melbourne’s Alfred Hospital to have it removed and recover. This was a major operation in those days and I still sport a huge scar from the bottom to the top at the back of my head. Thankfully I made a full recovery and have experienced no real issues since.

My journey with alcohol started at the age of 14. After watching my parents drink daily for most of my life I went to my best friend’s birthday party, also 14 where his parents supplied alcohol. Another friend and I decided that we would go to the local hotel and purchase a bottle of Rum. We did this and had no problem being served. When we returned to the party I blacked out and had to be taken home in a wheelbarrow. I have no recollection of this. The next morning instead of being disciplined I was laughed at by my Father.

As a young person I had a burning desire to become an actor. I loved TV, theatre and all that went along with it. Unfortunately my parents, nor did my school share my dream and I subsequently fell into the local booze scene. I remember clearly trying to find something to cling on to however there was no such option available and my slide continued.

At a family friends 21st birthday party I got drunk with my Mother, I was aged 15 at the time. Pretty much every weekend from there on in was revolving around drinking. My local Cricket club, where I spent much of my youth was reliant on alcohol and bringing young consumers in was not an issue, as long as we had our parents consent.

My schooling fell by the wayside and I took a job in retail at a local automotive store. After 12 months I relocated to Melbourne to work with the same business and lived with some friends who also moved from Horsham. We drank heavily and after a while I got a bit tired of carrying these guys as my income was greater so I moved out. By this time I was fully dependant on alcohol and had numerous attempts to try and stop, unsuccessfully. I just accepted that this was the way life was so I continued on my merry way.

I changed employers and was transferred to Shepparton where I lived with my cousin, who was and still is a very heavy drinker. Cards nights were a nightly activity and we typically stayed up until 5am, drinking and playing cards, before having a couple of hours sleep and heading to work. I actually learnt a lot through this period and found some maturity as the guys I was associating with were successful businessmen who taught be much through their ways, but also these guys were very alcohol dependant.

Another opportunity came up to transfer with the same company back to Horsham. I wanted to be closer to my parents so I decided I would move back. After enjoying the first 6 months back there I met a girl whom I fell in love with and wanted to settle down. Unfortunately she was also a heavy drinker and loved going out so I found myself back in the pub and nightclub scene. I remember having such a strong desire to clean myself up however had nowhere to turn. The two options for assistance were alcoholics anonymous and a local rehab centre called Palm Lodge. Given the stereotype and stigma I would have copped from the community to sinking to such levels I reluctantly didn’t seek assistance, again continuing on my merry way. Not long after I was caught drink driving with a reading of 2.2, four times over the legal limit and lost my license for 2 years. Other than the shame I received from the court case being publicised in the local

paper, my habits didn’t change. I was hanging around the wrong types who were dragging me down.

I enrolled in a 12 month course in community services and picked up a job at an institution for the mentally ill in Stawell working a four on, four off roster. Thankfully my father drove me to work each day and picked me up. I learnt a lot while here however being such a stressful environment almost everyone employed there drank heavily. Once Saturday night before I was due to work the next day I had a big one and rang in sick. I was sacked by my manager on the Monday.

I really struggled to find employment for a while after this. I worked with a local community care provider with disadvantaged kids however wasn’t mature enough at the time to give it my best. After a while I was offered a role with health and human services and returned to Shepparton.

I enjoyed my time there for a while however found myself hanging around with the drinking crowd again, and again was caught for drink driving, this time reading 2.1 and losing my license for 4 years. I had not learnt my lesson.

After seeing my peers drink and drive as a child I thought nothing of it. I am extremely thankful that these occurrences did not lead to injury to myself or others, as they could of easily have.

Not long after I thankfully met my wife and started to settle down. Her employer had regular Friday night drinks and outings in which I found myself being the last to leave. I dreaded these nights however once there made the most of it. Deep down, as I had for many years I wanted to clean myself up however did not have a clue to go about it.

After spending 10 years back in Shepparton my employer offered me a role in Tasmania, this was in 2003.

The major life changing event came for me when in 2009, very stressed and at my whit’s end due to the pressure of my work and my drinking I visited a GP. Luckily I got a good one. He told me there are two things you can do, I can give you pills or

you can exercise. Thankfully I chose the latter and began to rebuild my life, at age 38.

It has now been almost 5 years since that life changing moment. I have never looked back and have learnt and developed so much as a person, physically, mentally and now spiritually through meditation. These skills have been hard earned and I have pushed myself very hard to continually improve. I believe if the drinking age had of been 21 it would have delayed my drinking and I would have enjoyed much more of my youth without alcohol.

When I look back the influences to drink I had growing up were profound and I wish to do what I can to help others avoid alcohol or change their lives. Running a campaign like Game Changer has opened my eyes to a world that is concerned about economics rather that the health and well being of individuals, something that I am passionate about working to change in the future. I believe if the drinking age had of been 21 it would have delayed me starting drinking and I would have enjoyed much more of my youth without alcohol.

I hope that my story can assist you in some way. We have only one life and I am convinced it is best lived without alcohol or other stimulants. Having a clear mind and a clean blood stream is everyone’s right and we need to do what we can to help ourselves and others reach their full potential.

If only my Father hadn’t laughed at me at that critical time all those years ago. 

   ...Read More

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Call to lift drinking age worth testing

Oct 20, 2014  by 21bethere

A WA public health expert says a national trial of a legal drinking age of 21 could help show whether it reduces harm such as drunken behaviour and is acceptable to the community.

Curtin University professor of health policy Mike Daube gave guarded support yesterday to a call by Australian of the Year Ita Buttrose to have such a trial, arguing it was a debate that Australia needed to have.

Earlier this week, Ms Buttrose called for a shift in attitudes to alcohol, including voluntarily restricting it to meal times and considering a legal drinking age of 21.

She said Australia should have a trial to see if there were any benefits and examine what happened in other countries such as the US where the legal drinking age in some States was 21.

The issue of lifting Australia's drinking age from 18 has been regularly raised by health experts, with Australian Medical Association president Steve Hambleton calling for it to be raised to 25.

Professor Daube, who chairs the McCusker Centre for Action on Alcohol and Young People, said a three-year national trial of a drinking age of 21, that was properly evaluated, was worth considering.

For more READ …https://au.news.yahoo.com/thewest/lifestyle/a/19310590/call-to-lift-drinking-age-worth-testing/  

 


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21 BE THERE Consortium

Oct 8, 2014  by 21bethere

21 BE THERE Consortium was contacted by Journalist Brad Crouch of the Adelaide Advertiser, about our pending forum. In the quite lengthy interview, we were able to let him know a) History of activity and SA being the hold out b) current consortium and groups c) the State parliamentary committee into the issue and some other data. At the end of the interview he said ‘I think S.A is ready for this.’ The article got up as a top three in Adelaide Advertiser 8th of October 2013http://www.adelaidenow.com.au/news/australian-of-the-year-ita-buttrose-calls-for-drinking-age-to-be-raised-to-21/story-fni6uok5-1226734364352
What is more exciting, Brad interviewed not only Dr Carr-Gregg (Consortium members) but was able to get Ita Buttrose (Australian of the Year) to go on record as in favour of this initiative.
Keep the ‘conversation’ going folks – keep it going!
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Parents, please stop letting kids drink

Sep 30, 2014  by 21bethere

The uneasy silence from those in power while teenagers drink their lives away is frightening. The casual nature with which teenagers now abuse alcohol and recreational drugs has gone beyond the point where it is simply an issue for the minority; it is now entrenched within the core of the Australian adolescent experience. Australia's alcohol obsession is a well-documented blight on our society. What stems from the adult population's infatuation with booze is the kind of widespread, unquestionably dangerous under-age drinking culture that permeates school society today, fuelled by peer pressure and a senseless drive to rebel. This cycle of death and psychological self-harm is the bane of a productive society and it is a governmental disgrace that there is not more serious dialogue about how to manage this issue. The overwhelming weight of evidence suggesting that binge drinking drastically stunts the mental development of young people is reason enough to approach this issue with the utmost seriousness, and despite having invested millions of dollars in plans to reduce youth drinking, it remains a disturbing presence in Australian society.
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Teens taking alcohol cue from parents: National Drug and Alcohol Research Centre study

Sep 8, 2014  by 21bethere

Research suggests the earlier the start, the bigger the serves.

Research suggests the earlier the start, the bigger the serves.

Teenagers whose parents supply them with alcohol in early adolescence are three times more likely to be drinking full serves by age 16 than those whose parents do not supply alcohol, a study has found.



Read more: http://www.smh.com.au/national/teens-taking-alcohol-cue-from-parents-national-drug-and-alcohol-research-centre-study-20140907-10d4xo.html#ixzz3CmVCbLNa   ...Read More

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Alcohol Commercials Strongly Affect Underage Drinkers

Aug 3, 2014  by 21bethere

By TRACI PEDERSEN Associate News Editor
Reviewed by John M. Grohol, Psy.D. on August 3, 2014
 
New research shows a strong link between alcohol advertising and underage drinking. In fact, young drinkers are three times more likely to choose alcohol brands whose commercials appear on their favourite television shows compared to other alcohol brands, according to a new study from the Centre on Alcohol Marketing and Youth (CAMY) at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health and the Boston University School of Public Health.
 
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Long-Term Impact on Alcohol-Involved Crashes of Lowering the Minimum Purchase Age in New Zealand

Jul 31, 2014  by 21bethere

Taisia Huckle, PhD, and Karl Parker, MSc

ABSTRACT: Objectives. We assessed the long-term effect of lowering the minimum purchase age for alcohol from age 20 to age 18 years on alcohol-involved crashes in New Zealand. Methods. We modeled ratios of drivers in alcohol-involved crashes to drivers in non–alcohol-involved crashes by age group in 3 time periods using logistic regression, controlling for gender and adjusting for multiple comparisons.

Results. Before the law change, drivers aged 18 to 19 and 20 to 24 years had similar odds of an alcohol-involved crash (P = .1). Directly following the law change, drivers aged 18 to 19 years had a 15% higher odds of being in an alcohol-involved crash than did drivers aged 20 to 24 years (P = .038). In the long term, drivers aged 18 to 19 years had 21% higher odds of an alcohol-involved crash than did the age control group (P ≤ .001). We found no effects for fatal alcohol-involved crashes alone and no trickle-down effects for the youngest group.

Conclusions. Lowering the purchase age for alcohol was associated with a long-term impact on alcohol-involved crashes among drivers aged 18 to 19 years. Raising the minimum purchase age for alcohol would be appropriate.

http://ajph.aphapublications.org/doi/full/10.2105/AJPH.2013.301734  

 


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Tonga lifts drinking age from 18 to 21 years

Jul 31, 2014  by 21bethere

(Conversation in Tonga most certainly went up a level!)
Tonga's parliament has passed a law to raise the drinking age from 18 to 21 years.

It cited escalating violence among teenagers as the main reason for the change.

Health Minister Lord Tu'i'afitu told parliament he is convinced alcohol consumption is the root cause of the problem.

Drew Havea, president of the Tongan National Youth Congress, says it is not just young people who are causing trouble.
For more go to… http://www.abc.net.au/news/2014-07-30/tonga-lifts-drinking-age/5635760  

 


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Under the Influence: Considering the role of alcohol and sexual assault in social contexts

Jul 17, 2014  by 21bethere

Key messages

·  Alcohol is a feature in a high proportion of sexual assaults.

·  It appears that alcohol has a multi-faceted role in facilitating sexual assault.

·  There are social and gender issues around alcohol consumption that perpetrators are able to exploit to their advantage.

·  Alcohol is used as a tool by perpetrators to increase victim vulnerability and enhance their own confidence.

·  Alcohol is used as an excuse by perpetrators to reduce their culpability and accountability.

·  Alcohol may be consumed voluntarily by victims or perpetrators may coerce consumption or covertly administer alcohol.

·  Alcohol on its own is not a causative factor for sexual assault but it acts together with social and cultural factors that influence behaviour in relation to           social scripts and sexual interactions.

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Alcohol & Violence In Australia

Jul 17, 2014  by 21bethere

Key messages

·  Young people are more likely to experience alcohol-related violence

·  One in five Australians aged 18 to 19 years have been a victim of physical abuse by someone under the influence of alcohol.

·  79% of 18 to 25 year old males charged with assault on a Friday or Saturday night consumed alcohol in the 48 hours prior to their arrest.

·  Young people are more likely to report being verbally abused, physically abused or put in fear by someone under the influence of alcohol than any other age          group

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Should the legal age for alcohol purchase be raised to 21?

May 31, 2014  by 21bethere

Harmful alcohol consumption is a prevention priority in Australia. Frequent or episodic binge drinking (consuming five or more standard drinks on a single occasion) is of specific concern among youth because of their neurobiological vulnerability to the effects of alcohol. There is increasing evidence that key aspects of brain and related neurocognitive development continue into early adulthood. Available evidence associates short- and longer-term cognitive impairment during the postpubertal and early adult years with an earlier age-of-onset of harmful alcohol consumption.1 Although ethical limitations preclude human experimental trials, there is emerging neuropsychological and brain-imaging evidence associating binge drinking or persistent high levels of alcohol use with adverse impacts on brain development (notably of the frontal lobe and frontal–striatal circuits) in young people…. Read more at https://www.mja.com.au/journal/2014/200/10/should-legal-age-alcohol-purchase-be-raised-21

John W Toumbourou, Kypros Kypri, Sandra C Jones and Ian B Hickie  

 


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Calls for drinking age to be raised to 21

May 14, 2014  by 21bethere

Pressure is mounting for Australian governments to raise the legal drinking age to 21 to protect the health of young people whose brains are still vulnerable to the toxicity of alcohol at 18, leading health experts say. Four professors of mental health and public health have joined a growing list of influential Australians to call for a new legal drinking age that would bring Australia in line with the US where people cannot buy alcohol until they are 21. They say raising the age limit would protect young people from the brain damage that can be caused by too much alcohol and the harms associated with being drunk, such as car accidents and violence. Writing in the Medical Journal of Australia, John Toumbourou of Deakin University’s School of Psychology, Ian Hickie of the Brain & Mind Research Institute, Kypros Kypri of the School of Medicine and Public Health at the University of Newcastle, and Sandra Jones from the Centre for Health Initiatives at the University of Wollongong, said there was increasing evidence that the accessibility of alcohol from the age of 18 was causing great harm to young people. For example, they said a survey of 260 people aged 17 to 19 during end-of-school celebrations on the Queensland Gold Coast in 2010 showed 75 per cent played drinking games, 64 per cent consumed more than 10 drinks per night, and one in five had unprotected sex, in some cases with multiple partners. The professors said evidence from the US and Canada suggested lifting the drinking age to 21 decreased rates of alcohol-related harm.

The Sydney Morning Herald

  

 


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Canadian drinking-age laws have significant effect on deaths among young males

Mar 18, 2014  by 21bethere

Dr. Russell Callaghan, whose work suggests that increasing the drinking age to 19 years of age in Alberta, Manitoba, and Québec would prevent seven deaths of 18-year-old men each year. Raising the drinking age to 21 years across the country would prevent 32 annual deaths of male youth 18 to 20 years of age. A recent study by a University of Northern British Columbia-based scientist associated with the UBC Faculty of Medicine and UNBC's Northern Medical Program demonstrates that Canada's drinking-age laws have a significant effect on youth mortality. The study was published in the international journal Drug and Alcohol Dependence. In it, Dr. Russell Callaghan writes that when compared to Canadian males slightly younger than the minimum legal drinking age, young men who are just older than the drinking age have significant and abrupt increases in mortality, especially from injuries and motor vehicle accidents. "This evidence demonstrates that drinking-age legislation has a significant effect on reducing mortality among youth, especially young males," says Dr. Callaghan. Currently, the minimum legal drinking age is 18 years of age in Alberta, Manitoba, and Québec, and 19 years in the rest of the country. Using national Canadian death data from 1980 to 2009, researchers examined the causes of deaths of individuals who died between 16 and 22 years of age. They found that immediately following the minimum legal drinking age, male deaths due to injuries rose sharply by 10 to 16 per cent, and male deaths due to motor vehicle accidents increased suddenly by 13 to 15 per cent. Increases in mortality appeared immediately following the legislated drinking age for 18-year-old females, but these jumps were relatively small. According to the research, increasing the drinking age to 19 years of age in Alberta, Manitoba, and Québec would prevent seven deaths of 18-year-old men each year. Raising the drinking age to 21 years across the country would prevent 32 annual deaths of male youth 18 to 20 years of age. "Many provinces, including British Columbia, are undertaking alcohol-policy reforms," adds Dr. Callaghan. "Our research shows that there are substantial social harms associated with youth drinking. These adverse consequences need to be carefully considered when we develop new provincial alcohol policies. I hope these results will help inform the public and policy makers in Canada about the serious costs associated with hazardous drinking among young people."

Journal Reference:

  1. Russell C. Callaghan, Marcos Sanches, Jodi M. Gatley, Tim Stockwell. Impacts of drinking-age laws on mortality in Canada, 1980–2009Drug and Alcohol Dependence, 2014; DOI: 10.1016/j.drugalcdep.2014.02.019

http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/03/140318140757.htm  © Science Daily

  

 


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Professor Ian Hickie of the Mind & Brain Institute is keeping the conversation going!

Feb 2, 2014  by 21bethere

  

 


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Push to raise Aussie legal drinking age

Feb 1, 2014  by 21bethere

  

 


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Solution to Australias drinking problems

Nov 1, 2013  by 21bethere

  

 


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This is a Bolt out of the blue! Honourable Fred Nile, is most definitely keeping the "conversation" going!

Oct 15, 2013  by 21bethere

The Rev Fred Nile, Leader of the Christian Democratic Party, fully endorses Ita Buttrose’s call to increase the legal drinking age to 21 years.

"In view of the growing amount of new evidence concerning the development of the adolescent brain which clearly proves the damage that alcohol causes, I originally introduced my Alcohol (Liquor Amendment (Drinking Age)) Bill in 2008 so as to increase the legal drinking age to 21 years as is legal in many USA States”.

The rising adolescent road toll and binge drinking requires urgent action to protect the youth of our nation" said Rev Fred Nile MLC.

End. 



 

frednilehead











Letters: We should leave the drinking age at 18
Saturday 12 October 2013

READERS are most concerned with the drinking age debate sparked by Ita Buttrose's comments, Graham Cornes' column and the SANFL grand final.
No ideal drink age THERE is no ideal “drinking age” – that is, the minimum age from which it is legal to purchase alcohol.
Certainly it has to be linked to maturity, but that doesn't help much, since individuals mature at widely differing ages.
When a new figure is proposed, the first question we must answer is: Why change?

Is there anything seriously wrong with the current age of 18 years, and do we know that 21, for example, would be any better?
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There is a growing constituency for the legal age to be raised from 18 to 21

Oct 12, 2013  by 21bethere

My experience is that there is a growing constituency for the legal age to be raised from 18 to 21 for the reasons below.
The following figures show that we are currently having success with the message that early secondary school students should not be using alcohol.



The above figures are from Victoria White and Emily Bariola (2012) Australian secondary school students’ use of tobacco, alcohol, and over-thecounter and illicit substances in 2011. Report prepared for: Drug Strategy Branch Australian Government Department of Health and Ageing by the Centre for Behavioural Research in Cancer, The Cancer Council Victoria.

The figures show that there has been a considerable reduction in current drinking (drinking in the past 7 days) that began from 2005.

Why are the kids giving up the grog?

Researchers at the Centre for Adolescent Health, Murdoch Childrens Research Institute set a goal to reduce adolescent alcohol use in 2002.

The report below (through the ADF) describes the reasoning for encouraging adolescents to abstain from alcohol use. Toumbourou, J.W., Rowland, B., Jefferies, A. (2005) Could an alcohol-abstinence focus through childhood and adolescence reduce alcohol-related harm? Drug Info Clearinghouse, Number 13, pp. 1-21. Melbourne: Australian Drug Foundation. http://www.druginfo.adf.org.au/attachments/366_ResearchbookletFeb05.pdf

Starting in 2003 I personally completed 250 media interviews to disseminate the message that secondary school age students should not be using alcohol. This was the message on the ABC Catalyst and “Whatever the Science of Teens” programs. A key messages has been that parents should set rules not to provide or allow adolescent alcohol use. From 2006 myself and Michael Carr-Greg supported the Trinity Grammar School Alcohol and Drug Parent Resource Book that has been disseminated to most secondary school parents in Victoria (www.trinity.vic.edu.au). In 2009 the NHMRC guidelines were altered to make clear for the first time in Australia that adolescents should not use alcohol prior to age 18. In 2011 the ADF and other advocates successfully lobbied for secondary supply legislation to be introduced in Victoria. All these changes (and I am sure other factors also) are having the effect of reducing secondary school age alcohol use.

The theory we outlined in the Toumbourou, Rowland and Jefferies (2005) paper was that reducing early age alcohol use would lead over time to reductions in binge drinking as cohort got older. This appears to be the case in the trends we are seeing in White and Bariola (2012) report. If we are correct then the trend to lower use of alcohol in early secondary school should now lead to a trend for lower alcohol use as these low-drinking cohorts enter late secondary school.

Our current concern is that these low drinking cohorts are going to now face pressure to start drinking as they approach the legal drinking age. It is difficult to argue to 16 and 17 year olds that it would be best if they did not use alcohol, if the drinking age is 18. To further protect their healthy brain development we have been recently increasing our advocacy for the legal age to be raised from 18 to 21. The early secondary school parents and students we are working with are a new constituency that are asking us – “if at 18 the brain is not fully developed and is vulnerable to damage through binge drinking then why isn’t the drinking age raised to 21?”. Over the next decade the parents and youth in these low drinking cohorts will become an increasingly important voice for raising the drinking age.  

 


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Call to lift drinking age "worth testing"

Oct 9, 2013  by 21bethere

A WA public health expert says a national trial of a legal drinking age of 21 could help show whether it reduces harm such as drunken behaviour and is acceptable to the community. Curtin University professor of health policy Mike Daube gave guarded support yesterday to a call by Australian of the Year Ita Buttrose to have such a trial, arguing it was a debate that Australia needed to have.
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Open House Interview with Executive Director of Dalgarno Institute

Oct 1, 2013  by 21bethere

Check out the Open House Interview with Executive Director of Dalgarno Institute(Click for MP3).  

 


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Boozers destroy Byron Bay

Sep 23, 2013  by 21bethere

“We are facing a problem that is changing the very nature of our town. Ugly drunken brawls have become a constant feature of weekend nights. People are seriously hurt, sexual assaults regularly occur and older residents, some who've lived here all their lives, are afraid to go into town on weekend nights.”
- MLC Jan Barham
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Parents and youth

Sep 19, 2013  by 21bethere

Parents and youth, should take the time to remind themselves again of the facts around the risks and dangers of adolescent drinking – the following information sheet is a handy resource.   ...Read More

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Heavy Episodic Drinking in Young, Healthy Adults Increases Risk for Cardiovascular Disease

Sep 1, 2013  by 21 Be There

Heavy episodic (binge) drinking is broadly defined as consumption of more than 4 to 5 standard drinks (13 g alcohol/drink) in a two-hour period. Among adults, heavy episodic drinking is associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular events. This increased risk may be explained, in part, by alcohol’s role in endothelial dysfunction. Heavy episodic drinking is common among young, healthy adults with more than half of college students who consume alcoholic beverages reporting it. The purpose of this investigation was to determine whether young adults who participate in heavy episodic drinking have macrovascular and microvascular dysfunction and increased risk of cardiovascular disease compared with their nondrinking counterparts. The authors investigated macrovascular changes via brachial artery endothelial dependent flow mediated vasodilation (FMD) and flow independent nitroglycerin-mediated dilation, and microvascular changes via vasoreactivity of resistance arteries (isolated from gluteal fat biopsies) in 18 to 25-year-old nondrinkers (N=17) and those who participate in heavy episodic drinking (N=19).

• Subjects with heavy episodic drinking reported 6 +/- 1 heavy episodic drinking episodes per month for an average of 4 +/- 0.6 years.

• FMD was 8% (+/- 0.7) lower and nitroglycerin-mediated dilations were 20% (+/- 2) lower in people with heavy episodic drinking compared with nondrinkers.

• Two of three measures of vasoreactivity of resistance arteries were no different between the two groups.

Comments:

This study confirmed that heavy episodic drinking has macrovascular and some microvascular consequences in a sample of young, healthy adults, suggesting an increased risk of cardiovascular events. Given the cross-sectional design and small sample size, these data should be confirmed in future studies.Jeanette M. Tetrault, MD

Reference:

Goslawski M, Piano MR, Bian JT, et al. Binge Drinking Impairs Vascular Function in Young Adults. J Am Coll Cardiol. April 23, 2013 [Epub ahead of print]. doi: 10.1016/j.jacc.2013.03.049

http://www.bu.edu/aodhealth/issues/issue_july13/tetrault_goslawski.html

  

 


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